Friday’s Rag.

In contemporary society, Friday symbolises the end of the working week. I used to work in an office and Friday was generally considered the best day of the week. Everyone knew that they were about to escape the office for the weekend and could use their time however they chose to. Some people would start early so as to knock off early, to get an early start on the weekend, others would take Friday off altogether if their annual leave permitted them to do so. The general mood was of excitement, some anticipation and subdued joy.

I have little doubt that this was unique to my workplace. The saying ‘live for the weekend’ holds muster throughout much of the capitalist economy. I even heard one of my university professors say that today was a good day because “it is Friday and it’s the end of the week”. It is interesting to note the change of professional demeanour in the workplace as a consequence of the day of the week.

In today’s edition of the Daily Telegraph, the front page boasts two major stories. First, the royal visit. If you have not heard, Australia is hosting Harry and Meghan and the sheer amount of press coverage is incredible. The front page of all the major newspapers in Sydney bears at least one photo of the royal couple. This must be doing wonders for the royal family’s popularity – Australian Republic advocates, like myself, watch on with contempt. The second story on the front of the Daily Telegraph addresses state opposition leader Luke Foley, who allegedly drunkenly harassed a journalist when on a night out.

Working-class attitudes toward Fridays and the front page of the Daily Telegraph both share a relaxed attitude. Does anyone want to hear about the upcoming byelection in the seat of Wentworth that could potentially send the federal government into a tailspin? Does anyone want to hear about the butchered Saudi journalist? Does anyone want to hear about what is really happening?

The answer to all three of these questions is yes. However, the Daily Telegraph consciously decides to keep people in the dark about the stories that genuinely affect their lives. A character assignation on Luke Foley pails in importance when compared to the potential of the federal government losing its majority within two days. The royal couple has nothing to do with the price of petrol, though the international backlash to the murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi could lead to inflated petrol prices – making this a tough Christmas for thousands of Australian families.

People read the newspaper to stay informed and to keep up to date. But when a wide-reaching newspaper such as the Daily Telegraph skims over the major issues affecting people’s lives, there is no way anyone can expect to keep informed. The same could well be said for the television networks Chanel 7, 9 and 10. Perhaps it is apt to point a commonality between this major newspaper and the major television networks mentioned. They all rely heavily on advertising. Advertising anything from betting agencies (page 1) to banks (page 2) to toilets (page 20-21). There is more advertising in today’s edition of the Daily Telegraph than there is quality journalism.

More to come.

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